Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Toei"

Other questions about "Toei"

Q: Toei was originally a movie company that specialized in samurai period dramas, and even in their first TV cartoon production, they planned to produce something with a period theme. The show was an adaptation of the boy-ninja story genre that existed in Japan and was adapted into an African story. However, it was the era of the space race, and it was science fiction shows like Astro Boy, Eighth Man and Gigantor that attracted the attention of American broadcasters and distributors. In fact, "Wolf Boy Ken" was also purchased by a major program distributor, but it was never aired in the United States. This distributor sold many American-made TV movies to Japanese broadcasters, particularly Nippon Kyoiku Television (now TV Asahi), which was a client of the American TV distributor. Toei was the television network's largest shareholder at the time, so they only bought Ken as a congratulatory purchase for Toei.

It was hoped that exporting television cartoons to the U.S. would consistently earn dollars, but Japanese cartoon producers soon learned that it didn't really work out that way. To begin with, Astro Boy weren't really making as much money in dollars as they thought they would. NBC bought the second year installment of the show, but not the third year's. Tezuka planned "Kinba the White Lion," inspired by Disney's "Bambi", and NBC once again made a deal with Tezuka, but then the new guidelines for purchasing TV programs in the U.S. came into effect, and a result of that was the export of animated TV programs from Japan was hobbled by these guidelines. Speed Racer (produced by Tatsunoko Productions, led by Tatsuo Yoshida, who had been a rival of Tezuka's during his days as a manga artist) in 1967, was the last Japanese cartoon show, before the blank period of anime in the U.S. was coming. soa natural?
A: × It was hoped that exporting television cartoons to the U.S. would consistently earn dollars, but Japanese cartoon producers soon learned that it didn't really work out that way.
✓ Japanese cartoon producers hoped that exporting television cartoons to the U.S. would consistently earn dollars, but they soon learned that it didn't really work out that way.

× To begin with, Astro Boy weren't really making as much money in dollars as they thought they would.
✓ To begin with, Astro Boy wasn't making as much money as they thought it would.

× NBC bought the second year installment of the show, but not the third year's.
✓ NBC bought the second installment of the show, but not the third.

× Tezuka planned "Kinba the White Lion," inspired by Disney's "Bambi", and NBC once again made a deal with Tezuka, but then the new guidelines for purchasing TV programs in the U.S. came into effect, and a result of that was the export of animated TV programs from Japan was hobbled by these guidelines.
✓ Tezuka planned "Kimba the White Lion", inspired by Disney's "Bambi", and NBC once again made a deal with Tezuka, but when the new guidelines for purchasing TV programs in the U.S. came into effect, they resulted in the export of animated TV programs from Japan being hobbled by these guidelines.
(You can put the commas either outside of or inside of the quotation marks. Outside is British English, inside is American English. Also, it's not a spelling error on my part! 'Kimba' is romanized as 'Kimba' and not 'Kinba', even though 'Kinba' would technically be correct.)

× Speed Racer (produced by Tatsunoko Productions, led by Tatsuo Yoshida, who had been a rival of Tezuka's during his days as a manga artist) in 1967, was the last Japanese cartoon show, before the blank period of anime in the U.S. was coming.
✓ Speed Racer, produced by Tatsunoko Productions, led by Tatsuo Yoshida, who had been a rival of Tezuka's during his days as a manga artist, was released in 1967 and it was the last Japanese cartoon show before anime left the U.S./disappeared from the U.S.
(alternative wordings might be 'the disappearance/departure of anime from the U.S.' and things like that but saying "blank period of anime in the U.S." makes it sound a bit contradictory. Like, it's a blank period, but it's still in the U.S.?)

Q: Toei was originally a movie company that specialized in samurai period dramas, and even in their first TV cartoon production, they planned to produce something with a period theme. The show was an adaptation of the boy-ninja story genre that existed in Japan and was adapted into an African story. However, it was the era of the space race, and it was science fiction shows like Astro Boy, Eighth Man and Gigantor that attracted the attention of American broadcasters and distributors. In fact, "Wolf Boy Ken" was also purchased by a major program distributor, but it was never aired in the United States. This distributor sold many American-made TV movies to Japanese broadcasters, particularly Nippon Kyoiku Television (now TV Asahi), which was a client of the American TV distributor. Toei was the television network's largest shareholder at the time, so they only bought Ken as a congratulatory purchase for Toei.

It was hoped that exporting television cartoons to the U.S. would consistently earn dollars, but Japanese cartoon producers soon learned that it didn't really work out that way. To begin with, Astro Boy weren't really making as much money in dollars as they thought they would. NBC bought the second year installment of the show, but not the third year's. Tezuka planned "Kinba the White Lion," inspired by Disney's "Bambi", and NBC once again made a deal with Tezuka, but then the new guidelines for purchasing TV programs in the U.S. came into effect, and a result of that was the export of animated TV programs from Japan was hobbled by these guidelines. Speed Racer (produced by Tatsunoko Productions, led by Tatsuo Yoshida, who had been a rival of Tezuka's during his days as a manga artist) in 1967, was the last Japanese cartoon show, before the blank period of anime in the U.S. was coming. soa natural?
A: Yours: It was hoped that exporting television cartoons to the U.S. would consistently earn dollars, but Japanese cartoon producers soon learned that it didn't really work out that way.

Correction: Japanese cartoon producers hoped that exporting television cartoons to the U.S. would consistently earn dollars, but they soon learned that it didn't really work out that way.
————————————
Yours: To begin with, Astro Boy weren't really making as much money in dollars as they thought they would.

Correction: To begin with, Astro Boy wasn't making as much money as they thought it would.
————————————
Yours: NBC bought the second year installment of the show, but not the third year's.

Correction: NBC bought the second installment of the show, but not the third.
————————————
Yours: Tezuka planned "Kinba the White Lion," inspired by Disney's "Bambi", and NBC once again made a deal with Tezuka, but then the new guidelines for purchasing TV programs in the U.S. came into effect, and a result of that was the export of animated TV programs from Japan was hobbled by these guidelines.

Correction: Tezuka planned "Kimba the White Lion", inspired by Disney's "Bambi", and NBC once again made a deal with Tezuka, but when the new guidelines for purchasing TV programs in the U.S. came into effect, they resulted in the export of animated TV programs from Japan being hobbled by these guidelines.
(You can put the commas either outside of or inside of the quotation marks. Outside is British English, inside is American English. Also, it's not a spelling error on my part! 'Kimba' is romanized as 'Kimba' and not 'Kinba', even though 'Kinba' would technically be correct.)
————————————
Yours: Speed Racer (produced by Tatsunoko Productions, led by Tatsuo Yoshida, who had been a rival of Tezuka's during his days as a manga artist) in 1967, was the last Japanese cartoon show, before the blank period of anime in the U.S. is coming.

Correction: Speed Racer, produced by Tatsunoko Productions, led by Tatsuo Yoshida, who had been a rival of Tezuka's during his days as a manga artist, was released in 1967 and it was the last Japanese cartoon show before anime left the U.S./disappeared from the U.S.
(alternative wordings might be 'the disappearance/departure of anime from the U.S.' and things like that but saying "blank period of anime in the U.S." makes it sound a bit contradictory. Like, it's a blank period, but it's still in the U.S.?)
————————————
I recommend breaking up your last two sentences as they're really long. I put your original sentence and then mine so you could compare the minute changes I made
Q: Toei Offers the Idea of Payment by Results to the Union

Toei Animation began examining possibility of payment by results, presuming that experienced animators should be paid partly on the basis of performance so that they feel rewarded sufficiently for their own effort and talent . Or they intended to make human cost more efficient because they’re made promise employees to increase in payment after the strike. With enhancement of annual output of features as well as subcontract production of an American TV cartoon show, it seemed more reasonable for the employer to pay an animator according to the amount of drawings or shots he made. Nowadays in Japan most animators are not hired, but paid in proportion to output (or the ‘compensatory fee’ system for keeping him working exclusively as a freelancer for a certain studio for a fixed-term or for a feature); the first seed of the practically-illegal way was apparently sowed in Toei Animation after the 1962 strike. soa natural?
A: × Toei Offers the Idea of Payment by Results to the Union
Toei Suggests the Idea of Payment by Results to the Union

× According to a union organ issued at that time, the company was examining possibility of payment by results, presuming that experienced animators should be paid partly on the basis of performance so that they feel rewarded sufficiently for their own effort and talent .
✓ According to a union ——- issued at that time, the company was examining possibility of payment by results, presuming that experienced animators should be paid partly on the basis of performance so that they feel sufficiently rewarded for their efforts and talent.

× Or they intended to make human cost more efficient because they’re made promise employees to increase in payment after the strike.
✓ This could also be an attempt to be more cost-efficient, as the company has promised employees a raise after the strike.

× With enhancement of annual output of features as well as subcontract production of an American TV cartoon show, it seemed more reasonable for the employer to pay an animator according to the amount of drawings or shots he made.
✓ With an increase in the annual output of features, as well as subcontracted production of an American TV cartoon show, it seems more reasonable for the company to pay the animators according to the amount of drawings or shots they made.

× Nowadays in Japan most animators are not hired, but paid in proportion to output (or the ‘compensatory fee’ system for keeping him working exclusively as a freelancer for a certain studio for a fixed-term or for a feature); the first seed of the practically-illegal way was apparently sowed in Toei Animation after the 1962 strike.
✓ Nowadays in Japan most animators are not hired, but paid in proportion to output (or the ‘compensatory fee’- a system for keeping them working exclusively as a freelancer for a certain studio for a fixed-term, or for a feature); the first seed of the practically-illegal way was apparently sowed in Toei Animation after the 1962 strike.

The only part I am at a loss for is the use of the word “organ” in the first sentence. I’m not sure if you meant a speech, or a statement, or a pamphlet?

I think a lot of what you are saying here is very clear, and I don’t want to put my words in your mouth, so to speak. I hope these corrections capture the same spirit as your original text did. Great work!
Q: Toei President Flies to Hollywood

Toei, accordingly, examined possibility of raising annual output of features from one to two for making up for their rising labor cost as well as of acquiring outsourcing business from American cartoon studios, as Okawa flied to the U.S. and had talks with UPA executives in Hollywood on an American TV cartoon show production when his employees were on strike . UPA was formed by dropouts from Disney strike in 1941, as mentioned in Chapter 8 from _Drawing the Line_. They broke new ground by developing the simple and graphical style instead of following Disney’s naturalistic style, which required an immense amount of manpower, time and effort, while UPA fell behind other studios in the field of TV cartoon, having difficulty in management. In fact, the book mentions that some American TV cartoon shows were being outsourced abroad in the beginning of 1960’s.

The talks between Okawa and UPA executives apparently ended up in smoke for some reason. That would have possibly serve as a boon along with almighty dollars for the Toei group which was having big trouble in earnings and was exploiting a new way in the field of TV in 1962, if Okawa had made a deal with UPA. soa natural?
A: × Toei, accordingly, examined possibility of raising annual output of features from one to two for making up for their rising labor cost as well as of acquiring outsourcing business from American cartoon studios, as Okawa flied to the U.S. and had talks with UPA executives in Hollywood on an American TV cartoon show production when his employees were on strike .
✓ To make up for labor costs, Toei has examined the possibility of raising the annual output of features from one to two films, as well as acquiring outsourced business from American cartoon studios. Okawa flew to the U.S. and had talks with UPA executives in Hollywood about an American anime production while his employees were on strike .

× UPA was formed by dropouts from Disney strike in 1941, as mentioned in Chapter 8 from _Drawing the Line_.
✓ UPA was formed by members of the Disney strike in 1941, as mentioned in Chapter 8 from ”Drawing the Line.”

× They broke new ground by developing the simple and graphical style instead of following Disney’s naturalistic style, which required an immense amount of manpower, time and effort, while UPA fell behind other studios in the field of TV cartoon, having difficulty in management.
✓ They broke new ground by developing a simple and graphical style, instead of following Disney’s naturalistic style, which required an immense amount of manpower, time, and effort. Eventually, UPA fell behind other studios in the field of TV cartoons, having difficulty in management.

× In fact, the book mentions that some American TV cartoon shows were being outsourced abroad in the beginning of 1960’s.
✓ In fact, the book mentions that some American TV cartoon shows were being outsourced in the beginning of the 1960s.

× The talks between Okawa and UPA executives apparently ended up in smoke for some reason.
✓ The talks between Okawa and UPA executives apparently went up in smoke for some reason.

× That would have possibly serve as a boon along with almighty dollars for the Toei group which was having big trouble in earnings and was exploiting a new way in the field of TV in 1962, if Okawa had made a deal with UPA.
✓ A deal with UPA could have possibly served as a boon (along with big money) for the Toei group, which was having major trouble in earnings and was exploiting a new way in the field of TV in 1962.

Q: Toei Animation Union Finally Recognized in 1961

In 1961, they challenged once more with underground activities for exchanging opinions. On September, they officially announced they started up an in-house union and finally made the company accepted it after fierce storms, preceding the strike of next year during production of Toei Animation’s fifth feature "The Arabian Nights: The Adventures of Sinbad", when they won a firm commitment from the company for better conditions of employment including salary increase. soa natural?
A: × In 1961, they challenged once more with underground activities for exchanging opinions.
✓ In 1961, they challenged once more, exchanging opinions underground.

× On September, they officially announced they started up an in-house union and finally made the company accepted it after fierce storms, preceding the strike of next year during production of Toei Animation’s fifth feature "The Arabian Nights: The Adventures of Sinbad", when they won a firm commitment from the company for better conditions of employment including salary increase.
✓ On September, they officially announced that they had started up an in-house union, that had been accepted by the company albeit after fierce negotiations. They won a firm commitment from the company for better conditions of employment including salary increase. This was before the strike of following year during production of Toei Animation’s fifth feature "The Arabian Nights: The Adventures of Sinbad".

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