Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Proverbs"

The meaning of "Proverbs" in various phrases and sentences

Q: O que significa proverbs?
A: A short, concise saying in general use, stating a general truth or piece of advice.
Q: O que significa french proverbs 'He who can lick can bite.'?
A: In this phrase "lick" means something that is nice and gentle. "Bite" is something fierce and dangerous. It means that someone or something that is good and kind can also be strong and dangerous. It can mean either "something that is good can have a harsh side" or "someone who is humble can also defend themselves".
Q: O que significa these proverbs?
A: 1. Family should be able to forgive each other for anything
2. A mother always thinks of her children
3. Family is the most important
4. Things come and go easily
5. "Birds IN their little nests agree" children should not argue with each other

Synonyms of "Proverbs" and their differences

Q: Qual é a diferença entre proverbs e sayings ?
A: A saying is just an expression or a metaphor that is said commonly.

“Where there is smoke, there is fire.”
“I’ll kill two birds with one stone.”
“when in Rome, do as the Roman’s do.”

A proverb is very similar, but it usually has a lesson or advice in it.

“All that glitters is not gold.”
“An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”
“Curiosity killed the cat.”

Otherwise than this, there is not much difference between a proverb and a saying
Q: Qual é a diferença entre proverbs e idioms ?
A: Idiom
Examples of U.K. Idioms:
- Up the duff (To be pregnant)
- By the skin of your teeth (To only just be successful e.g you get 71 on an exam where the pass mark is 70)
- Call it a day (to stop doing what your doing)

Idioms are phrases that have different meanings from the words used. They can be difficult to understand.


Proverb
Examples of U.K. proverbs:
- Two wrongs don't make a right (When someone has done something bad to you, taking revenge will only make things worse.)
- No man is an island (You can't live completely independently. Everyone needs help from other people at some point.)
- The best things in life are free (We don't have to pay for the things that are really valuable, like love, friendship, etc.)

Proverbs are the traditional / historic sayings of a country. They are short, clever sentences that usually offer life advice.
Q: Qual é a diferença entre proverbs e idioms ?
A: Proverbs make sense on their own, and give advice.
"An apple a day keeps the doctor away"
"Two wrongs don't make a right"

Idioms don't make any sense unless you know the underlying meaning.
"Close, but no cigar" (Close, but you didn't win)
"The pot calling the kettle black"(Don't be a hypocrite)

Translations of "Proverbs"

Q: Como é que se diz isto em Inglês (RU)? What are your favorite English proverbs? What do they mean?
A: Check the question to view the answer

Other questions about "Proverbs"

Q: There are so many proverbs in Japan.
I think one of them is becoming more suitable for today's society.
It is "口は災いのもと" in Japanese meaning "Out of the mouth comes evil".
Unintentional remarks will spread around the world, even a single word.
In fact, the chairman of the Tokyo Organizing Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games said derogatory remarks for women forced him to resign as the chairman last month.
The internet and SNS have great power.
I was made to think about how to deal with these.
I'll be careful not to get me in a situation of "Out of the mouth comes evil". soa natural?
A: × There are so many proverbs in Japan.
✓ There are many Japanese proverbs.

× I think one of them is becoming more suitable for today's society.
✓ There's one that I think is becoming more and more relevant to today's society.

× It is "口は災いのもと" in Japanese meaning "Out of the mouth comes evil".
✓ In Japanese, it is "口は災いのもと," which means "the mouth is the root of misfortune."

× Unintentional remarks will spread around the world, even a single word.
✓ Unintentional remarks, even a single word, will spread around the world.

× In fact, the chairman of the Tokyo Organizing Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games said derogatory remarks for women forced him to resign as the chairman last month.
✓ For instance, the chairman of the Tokyo Organizing Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games made remarks that were derogatory toward women and which forced him to resign as the chairman last month.

× The internet and SNS have great power.
✓ The internet and social media have great power.

× I was made to think about how to deal with these.
✓ It made me think about how I should behave online.

× I'll be careful not to get me in a situation of "Out of the mouth comes evil".
✓ I'll be careful not to get myself in a situation where "the mouth is the root of misfortune."

I think 災い is more like "misfortune" or "downfall" rather than "evil."

For "unintentional remarks," I might say instead "unintentionally offensive remarks." The remarks themselves aren't always unintentional. It's how they are received that is unintentional.
Q: Please teach me any common proverbs which all the American people know such as ぶたにしんじゆ、のれんにうでおし、ふくすいぼんにかえらず、りかにかんむりをたださず
A: Well, "pearls before swine" is an English expression, so that one translates perfectly.

You win some, you lose some
An eye for an eye
Curiosity killed the cat
Don't put all your eggs in one basket
Great minds think alike
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder
Live and learn
The early bird gets the worm
You snooze you lose
Fool me once... (shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me)
That's neither here nor there
You break it, you buy it
To make a long story short
Better safe than sorry
Practice makes perfect
The grass is always greener (on the other side)
Better late than never
Don't beat a dead horse
Too many cooks (spoil the soup)
Do or die
Let he who is without sin (cast the first stone)
People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones (or just "glass houses...")
That's like the pot calling the kettle black (or just "pot, kettle")
Let sleeping dogs lie
Leave good enough alone

There are hundreds but these are ones EVERY adult would know.
Q: Can you tell me some proverbs or sayings? The most used in day-to-day?
A: It's a piece of cake .....it's easy
It cost an arm and a leg ....it was expensive
Stop beating around the bush... say what you have to say


Q: What do these proverbs mean
A: At all costs : 无论如何
Make a killing : 赚很多钱
Make a quick buck : 赚点快钱
Get hold of : 找到/联络到/拿到
Get away from it all : 离开一切
Get over : 度过(某个伤心的事/难关)
Until the cows come home : 花很长的时间
Eats like a bird : 吃很少
Let the cat out of the bag : 把秘密漏出
Leading a dog's life : 过着不像人的生活
Q: There are two proverbs "Look before you leap" and "He who hesitates is lost" . these conflict each other. I 'll explain how they differ and insist that which proverb is better.

Both proverb says opposite things each other. The former explains the importance of preparation, and the latter says you should act positively if you want to succeed.
I often put off taking action and deliberate for long time.I always failure and regret owing to that, so I really know the value of taking positive action.
I think the latter proverb is better one because of these reasons. soa natural?
A: There are two proverbs "Look before you leap" and "He who hesitates is lost" . These "contradict" each other. I 'll explain how they differ and "explain" which proverb is better.

"The two proverbs" say opposite things. The former explains the importance of preparation and the latter says you should "take positive action" if you want to succeed. I often put off taking action and deliberate for "a" long time. I always "fail" and then "feel regret" "because of" that; so I really know the value of taking positive action.

I think the latter proverb is "the" better one "for" these reasons.

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