Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Chapter"

The meaning of "Chapter" in various phrases and sentences

Q: O que significa What does “Nation sure of that” mean?It's from Chapter 2, A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens.?
A:
"I hope there ain't, but I can't make so 'Nation sure of that," said the guard, in gruff soliloquy.

《'Nation》please notice the apostrophe which indicates letters are missing

'Nation = a shortened version of Damnation!
Damnation ...In profane use

The apostrophe is present because 'Nation is a short form of "damnation"

used in the sense of exclamatory phrases to express anger, disappointment, etc.

it is used as an intensifier, to mean 《but can't make so absolutely, certainly sure of that.》
Q: O que significa What's Chapter??
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: O que significa Chapter ?
A: Capítulo

Synonyms of "Chapter" and their differences

Q: Qual é a diferença entre Chapter e Episode ?
A: Traditionally, a "chapter" is in a book. "Episode" is used for TV.
- I can't wait to watch the next episode of this show!
- I read three chapters of my book last night.
Q: Qual é a diferença entre Chapter e Episode ?
A: A chapter is usually in a book.

An episode is usually a TV show.

However, this is not strict.

Translations of "Chapter"

Q: Como é que se diz isto em Inglês (EUA)? Chapter
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: Como é que se diz isto em Inglês (EUA)? Chapter
A: Chap-ter
Q: Como é que se diz isto em Inglês (EUA)? Chapter 7이 의미하는 것이 59쪽부터 73쪽까지 인가요?
A: Chapter 7 from pages 59 to 73
Q: Como é que se diz isto em Inglês (EUA)? Chapter one: 1. Numbers to Ten. Squares, Circles, Triangles.
A: You don’t need to say the .,: just pause during then , is a short pause, Is a longer pause : is a medium length pause

Other questions about "Chapter"

Q: Recall that in Chapter One we looked at how, at the end of the nineteenth century, it was "sound" that prompted the evolution of newspaper cartoons into what we now call comic strips; Indeed, in the "Hogan's Alley" series, as the cartoon eventually produced drawings evoking sounds, such as parrots chirping, cats fighting, boys fighting, falling, hitting, slapping and punching and so on, one of the fictional figures grew up to be as if a real popular comedian. Comic strips, however, could not express either motion or sound, only to present them in pseudo forms. In contrast, Mickey Mouse, a resident of animated cartoons, merrily got over this limitation by acquiring sound through the technological innovations of cinema. Indeed, handling a steamboat, he turned everything around him into an instrument in the short film. He tapped his foot on the deck, blew his whistle, banged sticks on pots and pans, twanging a washboard and even turned a goat into a living record player as an instrument for his beloved Minnie Mouse. Sound stimulates people's minds and bodies simultaneously. Fictional characters can be as good as real comedians just by evoking sound, whether pseudo or physical. Disney would eventually build an empire on this modest discovery, whereas Fleischer, at least when his team made "Noah's Lark," did not find it out. That was why the audience was not so excited with it. To them, it was an animated film just synchronized with musical sound. It had no "character" as we know it today in it. soa natural?
A: × Recall that in Chapter One we looked at how, at the end of the nineteenth century, it was "sound" that prompted the evolution of newspaper cartoons into what we now call comic strips; Indeed, in the "Hogan's Alley" series, as the cartoon eventually produced drawings evoking sounds, such as parrots chirping, cats fighting, boys fighting, falling, hitting, slapping and punching and so on, one of the fictional figures grew up to be as if a real popular comedian.
✓ Recall that in Chapter One we looked at how, at the end of the nineteenth century, it was "sound" that prompted the evolution of newspaper cartoons into what we now call comic strips. Indeed, in the "Hogan's Alley" series, as the cartoon eventually produced drawings evoking sounds, such as parrots chirping, cats fighting, boys fighting, falling, hitting, slapping and punching and so on, one of the fictional figures grew up to be as if a real popular comedian.

× Comic strips, however, could not express either motion or sound, only to present them in pseudo forms.
✓ Comic strips, however, could express neither motion nor sound, but only present them in pseudo forms.

× In contrast, Mickey Mouse, a resident of animated cartoons, merrily got over this limitation by acquiring sound through the technological innovations of cinema.
✓ In contrast, Mickey Mouse, a resident of animated cartoons, got over this limitation by acquiring sound through the technological innovations of cinema.

× Disney would eventually build an empire on this modest discovery, whereas Fleischer, at least when his team made "Noah's Lark," did not find it out.
✓ Disney would eventually build an empire on this modest discovery, whereas Fleischer, at least when his team made "Noah's Lark," did realize the potential it had.

× That was why the audience was not so excited with it.
✓ That was why the audience was not as excited about it.

× It had no "character" as we know it today in it.
✓ It had no "character" as we know it today.

"what we now call comic strips;" - I think using a semi-colon is grammatically correct, but it makes the sentence very long. A period is also correct so I would keep it simple and use that.

"merrily got over this limitation" - "merilly" here references the action of "getting over this limitation". So "He got over this limitation in a merry way/fashion". It does not mean that he became merry after getting over the limitation. Usually we would use words like "easily" to describe the way in which someone overcomes limitations.

You can leave it out here, and rewrite the next sentence into something like "He became known as the jovial character we all know and love by turning the different parts of his steamboat into various instruments." But this is just my opinion, and I'm nitpicking because your English level is very good.

"Fictional characters can be as good as real comedians just by evoking sound, whether pseudo or physical." - this sentence is a bit unclear to me. Maybe something like "through the medium of sound, fictional comedians can be just as good at evoking emotions as real comedians."
Q: As we learned in Chapter One, this has to do with the fact that comic strips evolved from newspapers, or mass-printed text media, while animated films evolved from the cinema, or visual media. It is also worth recalling that audio media caused the development of comic strips; the spread of the phonograph inspired evolution of cartoon figures in newspapers into "characters." Even animated films began as part of vaudeville stage shows, with performers (McCay proudly played the role) having a pre-show talk to the audience. Eventually, animation evolved from this kind of magic show to a genre of film shown in theaters. While paper media never included sound, which was physically impossible from the beginning, film did with technological innovations. Indeed, the popularity of radio as a sound medium played an important role in this process, as will be discussed in the next chapter. Along with this trend, animated film characters acquired "voices". Recall the fact that prior to this, comic strips and animated films had been intermingling, with the same characters appearing in two different media in the late 1910s. That took a new turn when the cinema got its sound in the mid-1920s. As a result, the argument about what a "character" developed into a more complicated one that also involved interests. Before discussing this topic, I will conclude this chapter with a brief overview of what the genius Winsor McCay saw in the new era. soa natural?
A: × As we learned in Chapter One, this has to do with the fact that comic strips evolved from newspapers, or mass-printed text media, while animated films evolved from the cinema, or visual media.
✓ As we learned in Chapter 1, comic strips evolved from newspapers and other mass-printed text media, likewise, animated films evolved from cinema and visual media.

× It is also worth recalling that audio media caused the development of comic strips; the spread of the phonograph inspired evolution of cartoon figures in newspapers into "characters."
✓ It is also worth noting that audio media caused the further development of comic strips; the spread of the phonograph inspired the evolution of cartoon caricatures in newspapers into "characters."

× Even animated films began as part of vaudeville stage shows, with performers (McCay proudly played the role) having a pre-show talk to the audience.
✓ Animated films began as sort of a part of vaudeville stage shows, with performers such as Winsor McCay (who proudly played this role) having a sort of pre-talk show with the audience.

× Eventually, animation evolved from this kind of magic show to a genre of film shown in theaters.
✓ Eventually, animation evolved from this kind of magic show to a genre of its own to be shown in theaters.

× While paper media never included sound, which was physically impossible from the beginning, film did with technological innovations.
✓ While paper media never included sound, which of course is due to physical limitations, film eventually did so with technological innovations.

× Indeed, the popularity of radio as a sound medium played an important role in this process, as will be discussed in the next chapter.
✓ The popularity of radio as a sound medium played an important role in this process, (as will be discussed in the next chapter),

× Along with this trend, animated film characters acquired "voices".
✓ thus following along with this trend, animated film characters acquired "voices".

× Recall the fact that prior to this, comic strips and animated films had been intermingling, with the same characters appearing in two different media in the late 1910s.
✓ Remember, comic strips and animated films had been intermingling, as the same characters appeared in two different media since the late 1910s,

× That took a new turn when the cinema got its sound in the mid-1920s.
✓ that took its turn when the cinema got its sound around the mid-1920s.

× As a result, the argument about what a "character" developed into a more complicated one that also involved interests.
✓ As a direct result, the argument about what a "character" is developed into a more complicated question that also involved interests.

× Before discussing this topic, I will conclude this chapter with a brief overview of what the genius Winsor McCay saw in the new era.
✓ But before discussing this topic, I will conclude this chapter with a brief overview of what the genius Winsor McCay had seen in this new era.

If you have any questions as to why I made some changes please let me know!
Q: Refer to Chapter D if you want to remember how the new production system of TV animation was mixed with the old animation feature film production system (with all the confusion that comes with endless trial and error), and how Toei Animation's animation artist pay and employment system descended into chaos as a result. This chaos brought to the surface once again the conflict that had been underlying the studios since before the era of domestic television animation: were the animation production teams "artists" or "workers"? soa natural?
A: × Refer to Chapter D if you want to remember how the new production system of TV animation was mixed with the old animation feature film production system (with all the confusion that comes with endless trial and error), and how Toei Animation's animation artist pay and employment system descended into chaos as a result.
✓ Refer to Chapter D if you want to remember how the new production system of TV animation was mixed with the old animation feature film production system (with all the confusion that comes with endless trial and error), and how Toei Animation's animation artists were paid and the employment system descended into chaos as a result.

× This chaos brought to the surface once again the conflict that had been underlying the studios since before the era of domestic television animation: were the animation production teams "artists" or "workers"?
✓ This chaos once again brought to the surface the conflict that had been underlying within the studios since before the era of domestic television animation: were the animation production teams "artists" or "workers"?

Q: In Chapter X, I mentioned that when a Japanese stationery manufacturer, Seika, proposed to Disney's Tokyo office to acquire a license to use Disney characters for their products, Disney Japan gave Seika Co. a contract in English. Seika had not known what it was written in it until they translated it into Japanese. In other words, until then, no one in Japan had paid much attention to the theory of character licensing from Disney (or rather from the U.S.), and even the Japanese film company acting as Disney's agents, as well as the people in Disney's Tokyo office, had been licensing characters in Japan without understanding it. soa natural?
A: × Seika had not known what it was written in it until they translated it into Japanese.
✓ Seika had not known what was written in it until they translated it into Japanese.

Amazing!
Q: Can I say "I'm in Chapter 3 now" instead of "I'm reading Chapter 3 now" about a book I'm reading?
A: you could say "I'm on chapter three now"

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

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